Instagram head says it’s finally going to fix the app’s problematic feed

Instagram has been under quite a bit of hot water lately over its effects on users, but in the midst of it all, has introduced new features aimed at helping protect teens. On Wednesday, Instagram head Adam Mosseri announced during a Senate hearing that the company is working on bringing back the chronological feed to its app.

Mosseri made the announcement after U.S. Senator John Thune questioned him about whether Instagram would support giving users more control over their feeds.

“Senator, we believe in more transparency and accountability, and we believe in more control,” Mosseri answered. “That’s why we’re currently working on a version of a chronological feed that we hope to launch next year…”

While the feature was mentioned somewhat in passing, it’s a big deal for anyone who hasn’t been a fan of Instagram’s algorithmic feed, introduced in 2016. Mosseri explained earlier this year that Instagram replaced the app’s original chronological feed because “people were missing 70% of all their posts in Feed, including almost half of posts from their close connections.”

The feed has since been based on an algorithm that shows posts that it thinks you might want to see instead of what was posted most recently. So posts are generally shown based on their level of importance to the viewer, at least based on the images they like and who they interact with.

Still, many users have not been happy with the change, especially since Instagram introduced recommended posts from accounts users don’t follow.

That said, there’s no telling when the new feed will be available or even how it will be implemented since Mosseri called it “a version of a chronological feed.” However, it sounds like Instagram will provide users with the option to change how their feed displays content.

Just this week, Instagram rolled out its new “Take a Break” feature for iOS and the best Android phones, aimed at alerting teens to step away from the app. The app is also preparing to introduce more parental controls in early 2022.

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